Fall Wreath

Fall is sweater and boot weather, a relief from the heat of summer–that’s the North Dakota girl in me. In real time, the Ohio girl has 77 degree November weather and most people are still wearing t-shirts and flip flops. It’s still hard to get used to the difference. But, it is fall nonetheless, and I have scarecrows, pumpkins and acorns adorning my house. I also have this beautiful fall wreath made with just a few supplies–like coffee filters. I hope you enjoy this fun project.

SUPPLIES

  • 18″ Styrofoam wreath
  • About 600 coffee filters, tea dyed
  • One 7″ focal flower
  • 2 fall floral picks
  • 5 pheasant feathers
  • Approximately 12″ of wire for hanging
  • Hot glue gun and glue sticks
  • Two smaller flowers for balance ( referring to the picture, mine were a yellow rose and an orange daisy)

To begin, prepare the coffee filters by dipping them in tea.  This step is optional, but I preferred the light tan color for fall as opposed to a bright white. Be sure to dip a handful–maybe 25 or so–at a time. A quick dip will do the trick. Now the hard part: letting them dry. I anchored mine down with cups and glasses then placed them in front of a fan. Yes, I am impatient that way. They do not need to retain their shape so don’t worry about what they look like at this point. You may dry the bunch together; no need to separate them yet. You may wonder about the use of recycled filters instead of going through the process of tea-dying. This is an option too, but I thought the color to be too dark and they are quite a bit more expensive.

Dip tops of coffee filters in tea
Dip tops of coffee filters in tea
Tea-dyed coffee filters vs. recycled
Tea-dyed coffee filters vs. recycled

After all filters are dried, it’s time for the fun stuff. Make rosettes out of each coffee filter and glue onto the wreath. I know that’s a little overwhelming but the end result is worth it. Here’s how to form a rosette: Fold the filter in half, start rolling one end onto itself, continue rolling to the end. Now admire your rosette. That wasn’t too hard!

Fold the coffee filter in half
Fold the coffee filter in half
Roll coffee filter in a rosette shape
Roll coffee filter in a rosette shape
The rosette will have a tail
The rosette will have a tail

 

The rosette will have a tail. Bend this tail about an inch, apply hot glue and carefully start gluing to the wreath. Glue rosettes close together for a full look. Do NOT glue onto the back of the wreath. You’ll need to keep the back as flat as possible so it lays flat on the wall. Make sure to wrap you wire around the wreath now so that your hanger will be in place and you can hide it within the rosettes.

Back of wreath
Back of wreath

After all the rosettes are glued (let’s be honest–it might take you a few days), it’s time to add the beautiful decorations. Lay your floral items on the wreath to make sure you like the placement, then part the rosettes a little and hot glue those babies to the wreath. You may not be able to glue directly onto the Styrofoam, just glue down as deep as you can. I placed my focal flower on the wreath first then I tucked in the picks, the feathers and finally added the smaller flowers and a few extra fall silk leaves from my stash. ( I purchased all my flowers and feathers at Hobby Lobby. Helpful hint: Picks are located in the fall seasonal section, not in the floral section of the store.)

Flower and feather placement
Flower and feather placement
Flower close-up
Flower close-up

You have just made a showstopper! I hope you will love your fall wreath. I can’t wait to get mine out of storage every year–even if it’s 77 degrees outside.

 

 

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Fall Wreath

  1. This is gorgeous and you certainly make it look easy. I’m going to have to try this, however, I’m not nearly as talented. I’ll let you know how it goes.

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