Cozy Fringed Flannel Scarf

With cooler weather finally here, it’s time to break out the scarves. Or, time to make a new one–in trendy plaids. This project is so easy, you’ll want to make a couple for Christmas gifts. Who wouldn’t want a cozy, reversible scarf made of ever-soft flannel? They don’t need to know how easy it is: no knitting, crocheting and only a teeny amount of sewing. Let’s go!

Materials needed (for two scarves):

Finished scarf will be approximately 79×19, depending on your fabric.

  • 2 1/4 yds. of each of two coordinating flannels *(see note at bottom of post regarding flannel fabric)*
  • Basic sewing supplies: sewing machine, pins, thread, scissors, large blunt needle (or tool of choice) to aid in fringing
  1. Lay out flannel. Cut down fold to make two very long halves. Lay one aside for your other scarf.
    Lay out flannel for cutting
    Lay out flannel for cutting
    Cut flannel at fold
    Cut flannel at fold

    2) Cut off long selvage edge. Even out any crooked edges along the short ends. No need to measure here, just cut along one of your plaid lines.

    Cut off selvage
    Cut off selvage
    Cut to straighten any uneven ends
    Cut to straighten any uneven ends

    4) Repeat all steps for your coordinating flannel.

    5) . By eyeballing, try to see which fabric is bigger and lay that one down first, wrong side up. Lay your other fabric on top of that, wrong side down. Line up with one end and one long side matching evenly. Smooth out as much as possible. Trim any edges that stick out so your two pieces will be the same size.

    Trim excess fabric so layers are the same size
    Trim excess fabric so layers are the same size

    6) Pin, pin, pin. Pin all edges together.

    7) Take your pinned layers to the sewing machine and stitch all the way around the edges with a 1 1/2″ seam. Be sure to remove pins before you sew over them!

    Sew 1 1/2 inches around edges
    Sew 1 1/2 inches around edges

8) Time to fringe. Pull horizontal threads out, all the way to the stitching. I found a blunt needle helped me to wiggle the threads down so I could pull them out. Another fringing option is to cut fringes all  the way around and let flannel unravel naturally with use and washings. This will be different than the picture but will be a fun look. (It will also cut your fringing time down considerably.)

Pull horizontal threads to fringe scarf
Pull horizontal threads to fringe scarf
Cut fringe option
Cut fringe option
Reversible flannel scarf
Reversible flannel scarf
Long enough to tie many ways
Long enough to tie many ways

I made this for a wonderful young lady for Christmas. I’m going to have a hard time giving it away! I guess it’s off to the fabric store to find myself some flannel…

 

 

*Note regarding flannels: Buy quality yarn dyed flannel, not printed or stamped. You can tell by looking at the back. If the back is mostly white, skip it. Yarn dyed flannel should look the same in the back and front. There is also a huge difference in fabric weights. There are no markings on the bolt that tell us thread count or anything of that nature. Buy what you like here, if it feels soft and not too heavy for two layers. I bought my fabric at JoAnn Fabrics and Crafts. The large print three-tone plaid is from the “plaiditudes” line (good quality and thicker) and the small two-tone buffalo check was from the flannel shirtings section (thinner). I love them both and thought they looked good together.

In the directions, I say “wrong side” and “right side”. it shouldn’t make a difference in color but one side might be brushed and the other might not be. You choose which you like as right and wrong sides.

 

 

 

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